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Pyro Enterprises
Hello, loyal viewers, and welcome to the Pyro Enterprises Fantendo Holiday Showcase 2015 Presentation! Normally, I wouldn't think of appearing on a rinky-dink program like this, but my assistant-
Err... co-host was very persuasive. This is his show, not mine, so I'll just be adding commentary while he gives the details. Take it away, pal.
I apologize for Mettaton. He just showed up and asked to be in the showcase. There isn't even any Undertale stuff in it.
Anyways, welcome to the showcase! We'll be following the standard three-day schedule- the 19th to the 21st- and we'll have tons of games to show off. Mettaton- well, he's the commentator. At any rate, have fun!

Day 1

Venture forward when nobody else will...

All of you probably know about Bravely Venture by this point. After all, I dedicated an entire day to it during the Spooky Scary Fantendo Showcase. I'm starting out small to begin the showcase, so there won't be anything big covered for Bravely Venture.

But that's not to say that it won't be cool!
The Asterisks

Being a part of the Bravely Default series, Venture had to have an emphasis on the job system. There are 60 jobs obtainable in the game, doubling from Bravely Second's 30 jobs.

What this guy didn't mention were the spicy little tidbits he calls "Lost Asterisks". Probably couldn't get to them.

Well, Mettaton, they aren't exactly lost. Lost Asterisks are archaeological rarities made by ancient civilizations and buried deep underground. A better term would be "Really Frickin' Old Asterisks".

They contain the souls of their original bearers, and if you find one, you can challenge them to a battle to decide who keeps the gem.

What, do you have to pay to play?

Sort of, but I'll get to that.

Lost Asterisks can be found through one of three ways: purchasing one as DLC content for 99 cents...

Oh boy, here we go.

Accessed via certain Bytes, or found for completely free via our next topic.

Luxendarc's Economy

Bravely Default's biggest sidequest was Tiz's quest to rebuild Norende Village, which was accomplished by collecting friends over the internet or StreetPass. Bravely Second followed this up with Magnolia's attempt to rebuild her home on the moon. Both sidequests were massively crucial, supplying the player with weapons, armor, and special attacks.

Special attacks? The place must've had dogs swarming everywhere.

Bravely Venture has a very similar sidequest- but one that blows everything done with this mechanic so far out of the water, and proceeds to evaporate said water with the resulting explosion.


Who's this guy? He looks like a game show host. I must say, I approve of his lifestyle choices.

This man, Mettaton, is Erutus Profiteur, wielder of the merchant asterisk and chairman of the Crystal Orthodoxy's Grand Treasury.

Didn't he work for those Eternian guys?

Well, all of Bravely Venture is essentially an alternate timeline. He's still evil, of it means anything. At any rate, since the appearance of the mysterious asterisk-wielding warriors, Luxendarc's economy has destabilized, throwing Profiteur and all of Luxendarc into monetary crisis.

Until he takes your party on as field agents.

Yes, the village minigame for Bravely Venture actually expands across the entire planet. Instead of simply unlocking items to purchase at Adventurers across the land, this actually affects the stock, prices, and special sales of every store across all of Luxendarc. In fact, once you progress far enough, Profiteur reinitiates the Luxendarc Stock Exchange, creating a real-world styled economy.

So, this man put the fate of the planet's economy in the hands of four kids.


Typical humans. At least they have good taste in entertainment.

True. Speaking of entertainment, the final piece of Bravely Venture info is sure to be an exciting one.


The Bravely series has utilized a unique take on the single-player RPG by allowing the use of friend summons, moves sent over StreetPass and the internet by other players. These other players have also added to the completion of Norende and the Moon Base.

But what if these players made things a little more... interesting?

If a player is Friends with another player of Bravely Venture, the two can make an alliance online. If they both happen to be playing at the same time, the two can actually join forces, playing simultaneously and working together.

But wait! There's more! Up to four players can team up at once!

Indeed, Mettaton. While each player only gets a single party member, they can combine the powers of different playstyles and jobs to attain combinations rarely thought possible. On top of that, all rewards go to the players as if it were a normal battle, so characters not even in the battle get equal EXP and JP!

Is that all?

Yes it is! That's all the information on Bravely Venture we have, folks. We'll see you tomorrow for the rest of Day 1! Until next time-


...Why did I let you in here in the first place?

Combine your strengths to ensure peace...

I've already introduced this game sparingly during the last showcase, ut I've yet to get into the real meat of what it's like. Without further ado, let's get on with that.

Story and Characters

The basic plot of the game takes place after a war between humans and an alien race called the Skrypt. The Skrypt won, but retreated back to their world instead of conquering or destroying the humans. This prompted the humans to take... drastic measures.

You mean like trapping the Skrypt underground with magic? That seems to work.

They began genetic manipulation and cross-breeding with the Skrypt they had captured or killed, creating human-Skrypt hybrids designed specifically to fight against the aliens if they ever started to reappear. These hybrids were dubbed "Operation Tredecim".

There are thirteen members of the group, each with their own skills and abilities brought to them by their alien DNA:

  • Clash- Agent I. The first successful human-Skrypt hybrid, Clash wields a pair of Skrypt protosabers, making him useful for charging in and laying waste to the enemy. He's had the most training and is the most focused on the group's task, but is a nice guy once you get to know him.
  • Flair- Agent II. Scrawny, schizophrenic, and hyperactive, Flair doesn't seem overly threatening at first. He is, however, Operation Tredecim's explosives expert, wielding human incendiary grenades alongside a Skrypt bioflare cannon and remote-detonated pulse grenades.
  • Castor- Agent III. A stoic bookworm trained in the art of Skrypt physics manipulation, which he affectionately refers to as "magic". Castor is a by-the-book mage, out of place in the sci-fi universe but still highly effective, using his power for elemental offense and gravity-controlling support.
  • Geist- Agent IV. More Skrypt than human, Geist is considered a failure by his superiors but valuable by the rest of the team. Shy and modest, he is autistic and mute, communicating via sign language. Geist possesses Skrypt-like cloaking abilities, making him an effective assassin.
  • Toxin- Agent V. The first successful female hybrid, Toxin is sarcastic and condescending, usually ticking off her superiors. She is a master of chemical warfare, being able to generate various types of poisons and gases on the fly to debilitate or kill her enemies.
  • Valkyrie- Agent VI. The only member of the group successfully trained in use of the Skrypt regeneration device, Valkyrie was made the designated medic of the team, capable of healing allies via grenades and beams. She's sweet, but under massive amounts of stress, for she is secretly scared of her massive amounts of responsibility.
  • Rail- Agent VII. Considered the coolest, calmest member of the team, Rail is an effective sniper with a unique style. Instead of using a sniper rifle, he utilizes a Skrypt magnacannon, which launches rounds powerful enough to penetrate any surface softer than titanium. He has a tendency to sit back and avoid conflict, but considering his job, it actually works out well.
  • Magnum- Agent VIII. Magnum is one of the few team members who uses only human weapons in combat. Raised on one too many action movies, Magnum is bold, loud, and hammy, with a dedication to justice and an almost superhero-like fighting style. He uses not one but two machine guns, and makes it his job to slaughter enemies trapped in a chokehold.
  • Aero- Agent IX. With the Skrypt's focus on ground infantry and vehicles, an aerial attacker was called for. Aero was born to fufill this role, the thrill-seeking daredevil trained from birth to operate a jetpack created from a fusion of the two races technologies. She wields her flight pack alongside a grenade launcher and Skrypt neutrino gun- watch her fuel, however, as she is helpless on land.
  • Century- Agent X. An experiment involving the Skrypt's time control technology resulted in Century, an old man in the body of a ten-year-old. Containing the mind of a veteran soldier, Century is oddly mature and confused by the antics of Operation Tredecim. His specialty is using time control to get the edge, such as teleportation or time-slow barriers.
  • Cain- Agent XI. Dark and brooding, Cain spends little time with the team outside of missions, disappearing to who knows where between them. His signature weapon is a Skrypt-enhanced handgun, which fires bullets of three different types- explosive, cryogenic, and piercing.
  • Machina- Agent XII. A girl raised in tune with Skrypt and human technology, Machina was raised to be the team mechanic. She's a bit naive and unused to human contact, but she's friendly and considered by the team to be the heart of it all. On the battlefield, Machina can create support devices to assist the team, or hack Skrypt machines to go haywire.
  • Nerve- Agent XIII. The most recent member of Operation Tredecim to be fully trained, Nerve acts as the strategist, using a keen tactical mind and bond with his friends to direct the flow of battle. His weapons are Skrypt drones, hovering devices capable of autonomous support or offense, letting him assist the team from afar.

That's a lot of people.

Exactly, Mettaton. That's why you're limited to four of the thirteen team members permission. There's no fixed party members, and the loadout is entirely your own choice.

As for the plot, well, the Skrypt are back, running covert guerilla warfare operations on Earth. The plot will focus on Nerve and Machina, though all thirteen characters will have their moments of character development, and will attempt to be a bit of social commentary on the use of child soldiers.

Well, that's dark for this show.


Try and try until you get it right...
Request3-Infinity Limit-Ver2

Ah, yes. Infinity Limit. The game that I developed within a single day and proceeded to create characters for which surpassed my mascot in terms of development. Time to finally talk about it.


The story of the game involves Möbius, a member of the Galantan military who is one of the few to survive when a mysterious time mage generates a massive spell, effectively wiping the kingdom out of existence. He soon discovers that he possesses the ability to reset time at will, leading him to create alternate timelines depending on his minute choices.

Timeline resetting? Where have I heard that before?

Shut it, Mettaton. Anyways, by this point in the story, Möbius has been effectively been alive for thousands of years, looping over and over to find every possible minute change. Deciding that he's had enough of this lonely existence, he sets off to give the world the best possible timeline he can before he finally departs for the land of the dead.

Infinity Limit is inspired by three games: the Elder Scrolls series, Bayonetta, and Undertale. The gameplay is almost entirely based on the first two games, having a vast world to explore like the former and agile combat like the latter.

One addition to combat that Möbius possesses is the Infinity Limit ability. This ability is effectively the time traveller looping a single strike over and over throughout time, effectively dealing literal infinite damage.

Isn't that sort of... overpowered?

Indeed, an attack with infinite damage that doesn't need unlocking sounds broken, but the Infinity Limit is near necessary for some instances. For example, one boss fight begins with Möbius using the move on it. The rest of the fight leaves him defenseless, having to dodge attacks until the Infinity Limit kills it.

Where does the Undertale influence come in? The timeline feature, though this game features a web-like map of the choices that you have made throughout your resets. The timeline resets when you die or when you select the option in the pause menu.

However, not everything is erased, most notably Möbius's nemesis...


Euler, former leader of the Galanta military and current wandering warrior, is one of the few survivors of the incident that gave our protagonist his powers. While most other NPCs lose all memory of your actions upon a reset, Euler remembers everything you do, and it carries over to the next timeline.

You've been good? She'll be less antagonistic towards you and may even join you.

You've been bad? She'll become vengeful towards your actions and become more focused on Möbius's death. Even killing her won't stop it, as she'll revive upon the next reset.

All in all, Infinity Limit is definitely a game that relies on one's moral choices, but don't be afraid to experiment...

After all, you have all the time in the world!


Captain's Log, Day 23

The island is as beautiful as usual. Clear skies, perfect temperatures, and sparkling waters. Our quarry is singing, and we can hear it clean across the island.

Samuel told me that they aren't predators. Strange. I thought we were here to catch the most fearsome beasts in all of the world. Apparently, the locals say that they act as guardians, protecting the island chain from powerful threats.

Nonsense. I've heard the folktales. The islanders offer up a few little girls once every ten years, and the beasts take them to their nest. The islanders say that they raise them as their own, magically transforming the girls into their own species. I know beasts, and this is just appeasement- sacrificial lambs sent to the slaughter.

I know we were sent to capture only one harpy, but I swear on the name of Clayton Columbia that I will rid this island of their magic infestation once and for all.

Quetz's Adventure

A secret project of mine, revealed to the public eye for the very first time!

What a shocking development!

Remember when I used to make a ridiculous amount of Kirby games? Quetz's Adventure is a spiritual sequel to all of them. It's a 2D platformer heavily inspired by the Kirby franchise, with a colorful world and focus on beat-em-up elements.

Instead of Copy Abilities, our hero Quetz has Magic. An RPG-style mechanic, Quetz learns various types of magical spells throughout the game. They can be found on Scrolls hidden in levels or by purchasing them in shops. Spells can be offensive, defensive, or support-based, and can be helpful in navigation.

As for the story, it's intentionally simplistic and a throwback to my pre-Rise of Shadow days. Half-human half-harpy Quetz is the only member of her race left when renowned hunter Clayton Columbia captures them all. With darkness invading the island in their absence, Quetz sets out to free her captured family and save the archipelago she calls home.

We here at MTT News hope you enjoyed the breaking news broadcast.

That's what the rules of my world are.

World's End- the MMO that I introduced over a year ago and subsequently forgot. Time to reintroduce and hopefully actually do stuff with it.

Essentially, World's End is an MMO about the exploration and interaction. Combat is scarce, each race has a unique method of getting around, and the full map is about thirty times the size of Xenoblade Chronicles X. That's a LOT of map.

The story is simple; your character is born into the world by Gaeia, goddess of nature and the earth. She helps you create your character, and you set off from the crystalline crater known as Gaeia's Womb. From there, you're on your own; the only towns in the game are those built by the players.

Combat is another thing inspired by Xenoblade Chronicles. It's very similar, but has an added element of teamwork to it. There are no classes, unlike other MMOs, and skills are determined solely by the skills you choose to unlock and equip.

And with that, day 1 of the showcase has ended! We hope you have enjoyed and are hyped for tomorrow! Until next time...

See you guys then!

Day 2

Hello again, beauties and gentlebeauties! Mettaton reporting live from the-

Mettaton, I've been meaning to talk.

What? You can clearly see I'm working.

You're fired as co-host. You aren't contributing anything, and I've already received complaints about you.

But- But think of the ratings!

Mettaton, this is a webpage. It's not a TV show.


Just get out.

*muffled door slamming

Fighting is a part of life...
Axiom Logo

Now that we've gotten Mettaton out of the way, let's talk about fighting. Yes, all of Day 2 is dedicated to fighting games, no matter the specific qualities of the games. At it has to be is a game about fighting another player.

Axiom is one such game, and a concerted attempt by me to create an orignal fighting game with unique characters and non-Smash style gameplay. What I haven't talked about is the story.

It's the year 2019 on the planet Gea, a world that closely parallels Earth but isn't quite the same. The renowned Dr. Anna Zanari has invented a technology capable of generating hardlight constructs, known as AXIOM. The applications for this technology seem boundless...

Then, disaster strikes. Dr. Zanari is kidnapped and likely killed by a terrorist organization known as the Anubis Initiative, lead by rogue scientist Kane, who plans to utilize AXIOM's potential for world conquest.

The game plot is a simpler Street FIghter affair, with varied characters venturing too and fro trying to defeat Kane for one reason or another, be it good-intentioned or not.

The story doesn't matter so much as the characters- and that's where you come in!

The Axiom Fighter Ballot will open soon, which will let anybody who signs up a character have it join the battle. The same description types as the official characters- moveset, backstory, Axiom Shift, and At a Glance- must be filled out, but aside from that, the sky's the limit.

And now, please look forward to a Mettaton-free showcase!

It's something that everyone, regardless of who they are, will do...
Heroforce Logo

Heroforce was the first original project I had on here, and probably the thing I'm first going to make if I become a game dev. It holds a special place in my heart, and this game is definitely not something I'm going to forget easily.

Anyways, you all probably know how the game is played by this point. It's a hybrid of a MOBA and a third-person shooter, inspired by a hybrid of Kid Icarus: Uprising, Xenoblade Chronicles, and League of Legends. So far, however, I've pretty much gone over the roster of selectable Heroes.

Let's fix that.


There are three main modes in Heroforce: Battle, MOBA Battle, and Rush. Battle is the simplest of all of them, a 5-on-5 free-for-all where only the final team kill/death ratio matters.

MOBA Battle makes things a little trickier, as the player bases now spawn tiny robots known as Mobots. These little guys will waddle across the map, trying to get underneath the enemy base and attack it. Keep the enemy's Mobots away from your base, while protecting your own.

Once the enemy base is destroyed, your new mission is to defeat the enemy team one last time, as without their base, they cannot respawn. It sounds simple, but they do get continuously spawning Mobots from the base wreckage, so it's entirely possible to have your base destroyed first and still come out on top.

Rush is more akin to Team Fortess 2's Mann vs. Machine mode than anything else. Instead of worrying about the enemy team and their Mobots, this team puts all 10 players on the same team, protecting the shared base from enemy Mobots. It's not just the little guys either; new, larger types will appear, and robotic duplicates of Heroes can show up if you last long enough.

There are, of course, many variants on these three modes, but completely original new modes will be coming later. If you don't like a preexisting mode, you can edit it in Match Settings, but this is only allowed in Private Matches.


The other big thing a game like this needs: areas to fight in. Here are the first 5 maps available at launch.

  • Frontier: The basic map. A medium-sized desert arena, filled with buildings of a long-lost culture and large sand dunes with holes eroded through them. Not much special here: if you enjoy normal military shooters, this map was made with you in mind.
  • Under: A subterranean cavern consisting of a central room with winding tunnels all around it. Considering how small the central room is, it's no surprise that most of the fighting takes place in the tunnels. Under is a map all about stealth; surprise attacks are easy and the most efficient way to fight.
  • Cobalt: A flat, levitating platform, high in the sky of Coronite. It's effectively Final Destination in 3D, having no raised platforms or special gimmicks. This is a map designed specifically for those who only want to fight.
  • Obelisk: Set in a volcanic region with floating spheres of lava, this map is marked by the massive tower in the northwest region. While most of the combat takes place on the ground, with hot lava to avoid and jagged rocks acting as cover, those who brave their way to the tower's peak are rewarded with not only an ideal sniping point, but access to an unique power-up known as the Obelisk Cannon.
  • Chain: Set in the tropical region of the planet, this bright, sunny map takes place on a quartet of small islands in a diamond shape. The rest of the map is completely water, but the game allowing you to swim allows undersea combat within the vibrant alien coral reef below. The islands may be safe, but you won't get many kills from up there.

On top of this, there's a special feature that can randomly appear on maps...


Bosses are gigantic creatures indigenous to Coronite. They appear randomly when playing a normal match, and their appearance marks a shift in focus to the new goal: beating the boss.

Bosses are marked with purple markings of whatever kind on their body. As members of the Blue or Orange team land attacks on the Boss, those markings shift towards that color. When one team has converted the boss to their color, it is defeated, and a massive shockwave rings out across the arena that destroys the other team's base and Mobots.

Every stage has a unique Boss, which will use the map to their own advantage. Know which bosses correspond to which maps, and you'll be prepared for when they arrive.

That's all we have for Heroforce, but we aren't done for today just yet!


Royal Decree - Effective Immediately

Our fair kingdom of Nottmia has fallen under siege by a group of criminals. Multiple barons and baronesses of the kingdom have fallen victim to this guild, suffering robbery or death, with witnesses reporting them as wearing dark clothing ornamented with a purple flower of some kind.

This group, now referred to as the Black Rose by our King and Queen alongside Judgemaster Trip, appears to be lead by a young woman with a strange metallic band across her eye. Reports show a similarity to the royal family, but no comments were made by them to confirm or deny any relation.

Judgemaster Trip has declared war on the Black Rose. Any association with the group will be punished by death. Citizen are required to report any activity possibly associated with the Black Rose.

The woman in charge of the group now has an official bounty on her head- 1,000,000 G, dead or alive.

So sayeth the king.

Black Rose

I hope you appreciate these surprise announcements.

Black Rose is an interesting beast. It has three main inspirations: Punch-Out, Assassin's Creed, and Starcraft. Our main character, Aurchid, is incredibly agile, using parkour to navigate across the kingdom of Nottmia for various tasks. When she runs into a combat situation- and she will, being a wanted criminal and all- the game relies on Punch-Out style skill, ducking and dodging until an opening can be seen.

The second layer of gameplay comes with the Black Rose itself. As leader of the criminal group, Aurchid has to command them and give them direct orders. You can take your thugs on missions, send them off to do your dirty work, or have them stay back and train. You can even recruit townspeople tired of the reign of the royal family.

As for the plot, it begins a bit familiar but soon becomes more complex. Aurchid is born a bastard princess, and is soon discovered and thrown from the kingdom. She is taken in by a group of thieves, who raise her and train her in their ways. Over time, she takes charge and becomes a Robin Hood-esque figure, attacking the noble to protect the weak. She's now got the kingdom gunning for her, even having lost an eye in combat with military leader Judgemaster Trip.

As for the metal band she uses as her eyepatch... that has a level of significance that not even the game can describe.

No matter what the stakes or the combatants...

Super Smash Bros. Y is sort of the "if I were director" Smash Bros. of Pyro Enterprises. It's less focused on being competitive Melee-style Smash and a more bizarre and twisted experience, designed completely to my liking.

And I've realized that, up to this point, it's just been sort of a standard Smash Bros. game.

No longer.

Super Smash Bros. Y is getting its second reboot. This time, I'm not going to even start with the characters, instead focusing on making the game unique with new mechanics and abilities to differentiate it from the crowd.

The biggest addition of all? Y Charge.

Heavily inspired by Cloud's Limit Break mechanic from SSB4, the Y Charge ability grants a similar power to every existing character, boosting every existing special. Players now have a dedicated button for charging this enhanced special, and this goes alongside the revamp of countering into a universal ability.

Smash Y's back, baby. And it's gonna be a crazier ride than you've ever seen before.

Even legends will do battle if given the chance.

I have a horrible track record with Zelda games. In fact, my second project on here was a Zelda game- not that anybody here would know, considering that I asked for it to be deleted myself.

My most recent foray into the series is Hyrule Warriors: Timelines. I had a big plot set up for this, a bunch of character ideas, fanservice galore... And yet, it didn't quite resonate with me. Therefore, I've decided to... modify it a bit.

The Legend of Zelda: Lost Conquest is a Zelda fighting game, heavily inspired by Dissidia: Final Fantasy and its sequel. Gameplay takes place in 3D environments, with an over-the-shoulder view akin to most Zelda games. Combat plays like a mixture of Hyrule Warriors and Dissidia, with the end goal to drain the opponent's Hearts.

Storywise, Lost Conquest has a similar plot to the original iteration of Hyrule Warriors: Timelines. The primary villain, aware of the series's split timeline, plans to reunite the fractured timestream in order to conquer it.

The biggest difference is the addition of a fairly large amount of original characters, made to represent certain parts of the Zelda universe that don't really have a character to call their own. These also include characters from Pyro Enterprises Zelda games that were never finished.

So, yeah. I have a lot of work cut out for me.

Well, that should be all for now! See you tomorrow for even more original IPs and cool stuff!

Day 3

Alright, day 3! The final day of the showcase! Today's all about original content- it doesn't matter what the game is, it just has to be new and original. With that said, let's go!

These are the things stories are made of...
Twisted Tale

Everybody has stories that they grew up with. Fairy tales like Little Red Riding Hood, The Wizard of Oz, or Alice in Wonderland. Twisted Tale is a love letter to those old stories, while simultaneously standing on its own as a solid combat game.

The story stars Grimm, a librarian in the year 2034. While his life is normal at first, he become aware that a hacker known only as "Wicked" has modified much of the stories of the past, corrupting the virtual worlds used to tell the tales and making them hazardous to the reader. Taking his assistant protocol ALICE with him, he venture through the story discs to purge the corruption.

Twisted Tale is a beat-em-up with RPG elements, inspired by Castle Crashers and Streets of Rage. Up to four people can play simultaneously, selecting from a wide cast of characters to combat against the horde of viruses plaguing the story. Every character is unique, from Sinbad's elementally enchanted sword attacks to Goldilocks's feral brute strength to the Fairy Godmother's ranged magic.

It's simple fun and good with friends. What's not to like?

A warrior standing against a mighty foe...

I've been planning this game for a while, and only now can I reveal it to the public.


Nichi Saiba is just an ordinary Japanese schoolgirl. She's perky, clumsy, and a major otaku by her own admittance, being a fan of pretty much every anime ever. However, disaster soon strikes her city when aliens invade.

She is then recruited by SHOUJO, a secret planetary protection agency who has dealt with these aliens before. Being one of the only people to witness the first alien attack, she is given a highly powerful biomechanical suit, granting her incredible power to fight off the aliens.

The only issue here is that she acts like a magical girl.


SHOUJO is a 2D action game, with Nichi being sent on various missions around the world to combat the aliens. Her primary method of doing so, save basic punches and kicks, is her suit's Jet Drive. This function is heavily incorporated into her fighting style, consisting of kinetic energy stored by the suit when moving or dashing. Jet Drive energy can then be used for projectiles, dash attacks, or flight.

On top of the action sequences, SHOUJO features an extensive story split up into episodic format, much like an actual anime. The story is largely a homage/parody of classic anime such as Sailor Moon, but I will be focusing on telling a unique tale with this game.

SHOUJO will be coming soon.

Or a simple card game between friends...

So who here actually plays Yugioh?

Not to focus on that specific card game, either. Trading card games- from Yugioh to Pokémon TCG to Hearthstone to Magic: The Gathering- are all highly popular and lucrative. Hence why I decided to make my own.

There's not really a story for The Hands of Fate, aside from the in-universe reveal of the titular card game. The primary focus is on balanced gameplay and a lot of cards. The rules are designed to be simple enough to understand, yet hard to master.

Each player begins a match with a full deck and a total of 1000 HP. Players take turns laying down cards, each of which have different effects depending on the type:

  • Hero cards represent a powerful warrior, allied to the player. Heroes have their own stats- HP, ATK, and DEF- and attack once every turn. They go for enemy Heroes if there are any, and the opponent's HP if there are not. In short, Heroes are the primary offense and defense in this game.
  • Magic cards are support cards. They are cast immediately upon being drawn, and range from healing to attack to debilitating statuses. When used right, Magic cards can be incredibly powerful.
  • Energy cards are the last type of card. They can be placed underneath any Hero card on the playing field for varying effects- put one on your own for a buff, or on an opponent's for a debuff. Some Energy cards do not activate immediately, but when certain conditions are met; these tend to be the most powerful.

The Hands of Fate is an attempt to enter a genre that Fantendo hasn't really seen up to this point: the card game genre. It may not be revolutionary, but my hope is that it'll be simple enough to get into but difficult enough that it remains engaging.

A massive journey across multiple worlds...

Hexis is an interesting beast. Originally a solely Fire Emblem-inspired game, the new iteration now takes inspiration from Final Fantasy Tactics and Bravely Default. The basic idea remains the same, however- a dimension-hopping journey that plays with strategy RPG tropes.

The story focuses on Cross, miner and indentured servant to Lord Denza, ruler of the world known as Axelheim. It's just a normal day for Cross when he comes across a strange girl of a species not his own, carrying a golden hexagonal ring with a strange aura. The girl gives Cross the artifact before she is executed by strange men in red armor, leaving him to ponder the item's power.

The primary gimmick of Hexis is the use of the titular artifact. Cross can utilize the Hexis to warp himself and things around him into one of 6 alternate dimensions, each of which possesses unique attributes that impact strategy. Maps are not only made up of hexagonal tiles instead of square ones, but also have a height mechanic, impacting strategy on a 3D level.

Classes act like a fusion between Fire Emblem and Final Fantasy Tactics. Classes are not locked by gender, but by species, and each class has unique skills aside from simply attacking. Characters can be promoted like in Fire Emblem, but switching to another basic class instead of going immediately to an advanced one can unlock more unique classes.

Hexis- a strange beast, but one that should be fun.

Or a fast-paced race through them all...

OverDrive has gone by many names during its creative cycle- HyperDrive, Xlleration, Formula Zero (which I swear did not make me think of F-Zero until far too late)- but the core concept has remained the same. OverDrive is a racing game, with a cast of original characters and a focus on pure, unadulterated chaos.

OverDrive acts as a spiritual sequel to Kirby Air Ride, taking inspiration from it alongside Mario Kart 8 and F-Zero. Inside of riding in karts or hover vehicles, racers utilizes Drivers, fusions of gears, tops, and hoverboards which glide along the ground. Every racer has their own customized Driver, with unique stats and skills.

While there are familiar modes such as Grand Prix alongside unique modes we're keeping a secret for now, the main attraction in OverDrive is Driver Trial, a heavily enhanced version of Air Ride's City Trial. Players navigate around a massive city, collecting enhancement parts and new vehicles to power up for a final event.

A completely new mode to OverDrive is Infinite Prix. This mode lacks a set lap count, and instead of trying to be the fastest, your goal is endurance, in an attempt to complete more laps than any other character. Every lap, you character is rewarded with power enhancement parts, making the match shorter the fewer people remain.

OverDrive will be coming to stores near you very, very soon!

Anybody can tell a story.
It takes a real spark of creativity to write your own.
See you at the showcase.

Wait... I could've sworn that was everything. Could it be... Mettaton!

Oh, SHUT UP! What, you want me gone and then come crawling back? Typical. Well, I have much bigger ventures than this little-

Oh, like you didn't edit the page yourself?

...No, actually.

Wait, you didn't add anything at all?

Of course not! Now get out!

Geez, geez, alright... Strange. I wonder what all this is for...

For countless dimensions, I have searched for her.

For countless dimensions, he has hunted me down.

The last thing in the way of me setting everything right.

The last person in his path to multiversal destruction.

My own daughter, blinded by her misguided desire to move on from the errors of the past.

My own father, blinded by his desire to reset the natural course of reality.

All I need is the relics of the Infinity Kingdom... One of which she has kept from me.

All he needs is the relics of the Infinity Kingdom... All of which where never meant to be reawakened.

For the sake of the universe, I must defeat my daughter.

For the sake of the universe, my father must be stopped.

The Pyroverse Origin Begins

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